The Foreign Service Journal - January/February 2014 - page 46

46
JANUARY-FEBRUARY 2014
|
THE FOREIGN SERVICE JOURNAL
Gerald Loftus, a State Department Foreign Service officer from 1979
to 2002, is director of the Tangier American Legation Institution for
Moroccan Studies. The Tangier Legation, America’s only overseas
National Historic Landmark, is located in the medina of the city. He
writes about the long history of Moroccan-American relations on per-
manent display at the institution’s museum at
.
Despite the wealth of material
generated by and about U.S. diplomat
J. Rives Childs, he remains an enigma
a quarter-century after his death.
BY GERALD LOF TUS
J. RIVES CHILDS
INWARTIME TANGIER
FS HERITAGE
O
n July 16, 1987, the
New York
Times
noted the passing of
J. Rives Childs (1893-1987), a
“former American diplomat and
authority on Casanova.”
Childs had led many lives:
volunteer ambulance driver à
la Hemingway and U.S. Army
cryptographer in France during
World War I (he later received
the Medal of Freedom for
cracking German codes); postwar White House correspondent;
American Relief Administration official (one of “Hoover’s Boys”)
in the famine-stricken USSR of the 1920s; and a Foreign Service
officer whose 30-year career culminated with ambassadorships
to Saudi Arabia and Ethiopia after World War II.
He also wrote 14 books, ranging from definitive studies of
Casanova and French writers of the 18th century (some writ-
ten in French) to several works touching on his Foreign Service
career. His final memoir,
Let the Credit Go
(1983), recounts his
tenure as chargé d’affaires at the American Legation in Tangier,
Morocco, between 1941 and 1945.
Despite the wealth of material generated by and about Childs,
1...,36,37,38,39,40,41,42,43,44,45 47,48,49,50,51,52,53,54,55,56,...100
Powered by FlippingBook