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THE FOREIGN SERVICE JOURNAL

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JANUARY-FEBRUARY 2017

39

ambassadors. That means Foreign Service officers, not wealthy

puff bags who have no foreign policy experience or just repre-

sent foreign lobbies.

Stephen P. Dawkins

FSO, retired

Key West, Florida

Foreign Assistance Represents

the Best of America

Development through foreign assistance is an imperative of

United States foreign policy. We showcase our values through

this strategic outreach to the global community. Through our

assistance, we demonstrate our kindness, generosity, goodwill

and desire for all people to reach their highest potential. Foreign

assistance represents the best of America. It promotes our vision

of the world at its best—one with peace, equality and prosperity.

One that benefits us all.

Andrea P. Capellán

USAID FSO

U.S. Embassy Lima, Peru

Your Eyes and Ears Around

the World

The men and women of the Foreign Service will be your eyes

and ears for the next four years, carrying out and explaining your

foreign policy. They will also collect and analyze local reactions

to it, both at the official level and in the streets.

Sometimes you will not like what they report back to Wash-

ington, but I hope you and your appointees will not reject their

findings out of hand—or, worse, shoot the messengers. You may

decide for any number of reasons to disregard their advice and

stay the course, but at least you will know the risks of proceed-

ing.

Steven Alan Honley

FSO, retired

Washington, D.C.

Set an Example of Respect for

Diversity

USAID’s workforce includes Americans of all races, religions,

ethnic backgrounds, genders and sexual orientations, as well

as immigrants who have chosen service to this country as their

path in life. Our employees are the face of our country and our

most valuable resource. We must ensure that all are treated

equally with respect and dignity, both at home and abroad

inside and outside the workplace.

USAID employees have sacrificed their lives in service to this

country, and we continue to place ourselves in harm’s way in

defense of our values of freedom, equality and basic rights for all

peoples. Furthermore, more than 10,000 USAID employees are

nationals of the countries in which we work, and put their lives

on the line every day on behalf of the U.S. government. USAID

literally would not function without the brave participation and

unparalleled dedication, contributions and expertise of our

Foreign Service National employees.

Foreign assistance is a crucial pillar of the U.S. government’s

strategy to promote national security, economic stability and

goodwill overseas. A vital component of this is USAID’s prin-

cipled stance to advance women’s rights; rights for marginalized

ethnic, religious and racial groups; and LGBTI rights overseas.

Where active civil society and human rights form the core of a

country’s foundation, peaceful societies thrive.

We must continue setting an example of respect for such

values at home to maintain our credibility overseas and suc-

ceed in our mission of ending extreme poverty and promoting

resilient, democratic societies while advancing our security and

prosperity.

Michelle Dworkin

USAID FSO

Washington, D.C.

Choose Professional Diplomats

America is seen and judged by countries around the world

through its ambassadorial appointments. There is a cadre of

experienced, language-proficient professionals in our foreign

affairs community ready to fill those jobs. To send unqualified

political appointees to represent us abroad is, in many cases, not

only disrespectful to our own system and the serious process of

conducting diplomacy; it is insulting to the receiving country, as

well.

I would hope your administration will look carefully at

historical precedent and strive to use fewer, not more, political

appointees to fill ambassadorships abroad and senior foreign

affairs positions at home.

Danny Root

Senior Foreign Service, retired

Bulverde, Texas