Page 22 - Foreign Service Journal - February 2013

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22
FEBRUARY 2013
|
THE FOREIGN SERVICE JOURNAL
Te table below, based on data from
www.USAspending.
gov as of December, illustrates the sheer magnitude of the
change in the way the U.S. Agency for International Develop-
ment and the Department of State have pursued their respec-
tive missions over the past decade. While the total fgures for
contracts and grants include expenses that do not constitute
outsourced jobs, and also refect increased resources from war-
time supplemental appropriations, the trajectory of the trend is
striking.
In 2000, the State Department spent just $1.3 billion on
contracts and $102.5 million on grants. By 2010, the value of
contracts had grown to $8.1 billion, and grants had grown to
$1.4 billion, increases of 523 and 1,266 percent, respectively.
Over the same period of time, USAID’s spending on
contracts rose from $535.8 million to $5.6 billion, a tenfold
increase. And its spending on grants increased by an astonish-
ing 46,014 percent over that same decade.
While the ranks of the Foreign Service grew during that
same period, the expansion in the number of government
employees involved in overseeing this explosion of resources
was not commensurate.
A similar trend unfolded at the Pentagon, albeit on a pro-
portionally smaller scale. But the shift was much more massive
in terms of total dollars expended.
The New Normal
Still, it is on the civilian side of the equation that we see
the most dramatic change: Outsourcing broad aspects of State
and USAID’s engagement with the world has become the new
normal.
Contracts in Contracts in Change in Grants in
Grants in
Change in
2000
2010
Contracts
2000
2010
Grants
State
$1.3 billion $8.1 billion
523%
$102.5 million $1.4 billion
1,266%
USAID
$535.8 million $5.6 billion
945%
$19.3 million $8.9 billion 46,014%
Defense
$133.4 billion $367.6 billion 176%
$2.2 billion $5.2 billion
136%
Allison Stanger is the Russell Leng Professor of International Politics
and Economics at Middlebury College and the author of
One Nation
under Contract: Te Outsourcing of American Power and the Future
of Foreign Policy
(Yale University Press, 2009/2011). She served as a
subject-matter expert for the Quadrennial Diplomacy and Develop-
ment Review process, and has testifed before Congress on contract-
ing-related issues.