The Foreign Service Journal - May 2014 - page 38

38
MAY 2014
|
THE FOREIGN SERVICE JOURNAL
An AFSA Timeline
1789
n
The Department of
State becomes the first Cabinet
agency to be created.
1791
n
Secretary of State
Thomas Jefferson establishes
separate diplomatic and con-
sular services.
1856
n
The Organic Act regu-
lates diplomatic and consular
posts and sets a salary cap of
$17,500, which stays in place
for the next 90 years.
1895
n
President Grover
Cleveland places most consular
positions within the merit
system.
1909
n
President William
Howard Taft extends the merit
system to all diplomatic posi-
tions below ministerial rank
and prohibits consideration of
candidates’ political affiliation.
1918
n
The American Consular
Association is formed.
1919
n
The American Consular
Bulletin
begins publication.
1924
n
The Foreign Service
Act of 1924, known as the Rog-
ers Act, unifies the diplomatic
and consular services to create
the Foreign Service of the
United States.
1924
n
The American Con-
sular Association reconstitutes
itself as the American Foreign
Service Association “for the
purpose of fostering an esprit
de corps” among Foreign
Service employees, and the
American Consular Bulletin
becomes the
American Foreign
Service Journal
.
1929
n
Elizabeth Harriman
gives AFSA $25,000 to estab-
lish a scholarship fund in honor
of her late son Oliver, a Foreign
Service officer.
1929
n
Foreign Service clerks
and non-career vice consuls at
Embassy Paris form Local 349
of the National Federation of
Federal Employees, called the
Foreign Service Local.
1931
n
The Moses-Linthicum
Act regulates Foreign Service
ranks and retirement.
1933
n
Secretary of State
Cordell Hull unveils AFSA’s Roll
of Honor, a memorial plaque
honoring “those in the Ameri-
can Foreign Service who … have
died under tragic or heroic
circumstances.”
1933
n
AFSA confers its first
scholarship.
1946
n
A new Foreign Service
Act replaces the Rogers Act,
creating Foreign Service Staff
officers and Foreign Service
Reserve officers. AFSA admits
members of both groups to
active membership.
1947
n
The Hoover Commis-
sion on Reorganization of the
Executive Branch recommends
merging the Foreign Service
and Civil Service within the
State Department. No action is
taken.
1950-1953
n
State fires
more than 500 employees as
“security risks” during
the McCarthy era.
1951
n
The
American Foreign
Service Journal
is renamed the
Foreign Service Journal
.
1951
n
AFSA replaces its
executive committee with a
board of directors, chosen
annually by an electoral college
of 18 members. AFSA has about
2,000 active-duty and 500
associate members out of a
pool of 12,000 eligibles.
1954
n
In what becomes
known as “Wristonization,”
State opens the Foreign Service
to about 1,500 Civil Service
employees, and makes a similar
number of domestic positions
available to FSOs.
1956
n
Junior FSOs at State
form the Junior Foreign Service
Officers Club.
SELECTED HIGHLIGHTS
Editor’s Note: As AFSA and the Foreign Service
both celebrate their 90th anniversaries, here are
some of the events that have shaped both institu-
tions. As with any timeline, there are many other
important developments we could cite, but we
believe these represent a good beginning.
You will find an expanded version of this
document at
.
90TH ANNIVERSARY OF AFSA AND THE FOREIGN SERVICE
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