Page 77 - FSJ June 2012

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J U N E 2 0 1 2 / F O R E I G N S E R V I C E J O U R N A L
77
S
CHOOLS
S
UPPLEMENT
that a therapist must be comfortable
with the technology he or she uses.
Studies so far have found that
there is no specific population that
will respond particularly well, or poor-
ly, to telepractice. I myself once
thought it would be impossible to use
with very young children, only to find
out that early intervention programs
are already using it successfully with
children from ages 2 through 4.
As with any other business transac-
tion, be sure that you engage a rep-
utable company and have a therapist
who is credentialed and qualified.
The American Telemedicine Associa-
tion is working diligently to establish
guidelines and ensure the effective
delivery of distance care. But the ATA
does not license telepractitioners
because telepractice is a method of
service delivery, not a profession.
Individual therapists are licensed
at the state level for their area of prac-
tice and, commonly, with their profes-
sional associations. Most states make
the status of a therapist’s license avail-
able to the public online.
Tearing Down Barriers
Simply put, telepractice is tearing
down the barriers between full access
and no access for children with special
educational needs. Access and afford-
ability are what the Internet has
brought to us, and I know very few
Foreign Service families that aren’t
Studies so far have
found that there is
no specific population
that will respond
particularly well, or
poorly, to telepractice.