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THE FOREIGN SERVICE JOURNAL

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JUNE 2016

25

coordinated and comprehensive manner.

While the United States is not exempt from the global

scourge of corruption—as our Founding Fathers knew all too

well and addressed within our Constitution—State and the

interagency community are working every day to guard against

it. Through continued implementation of the Foreign Corrupt

Practices Act, our nation leads by example, fighting the practice

of bribing foreign officials, denying the entry of corrupt foreign

officials into the United States and targeting perpetrators of

corruption and their ill-gotten gains both domestically and

around the world.

Our colleagues’ work at the Department of Justice litigat-

ing FCPA cases not only gives U.S. firms an incentive to enact

compliance programs, but serves as a model for other coun-

tries’ enforcement agencies. We are pleased that Attorney

General Loretta Lynch participated in a March ministerial-level

meeting of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and

Development, to discuss progress in enforcing the OECD’s

Anti-Bribery Convention.

In addition, DOJ has successfully returned some $143 mil-

lion in assets since 2004, and is currently litigating stolen asset

cases involving more than a billion dollars. State’s denial of

visas to current and former foreign government officials and

private citizens who have bribed government officials strongly

complements such efforts.

A Defining Moment

The State Department’s release of its latest Quadrennial

Diplomacy and Development Review in 2015 was a water-

shed moment. The QDDR gave clear instructions to all State

employees to expand anti-corruption initiatives and seek

ways to cooperate with interagency colleagues to strengthen

partnerships, promote capacity-building abroad and increase

enforcement.

The document also outlines our institutional commitment

to empowering civil society all over the world and ensuring

successful implementation of vital initiatives, such as the Open

Government Partnership and the United Nations Conven-

tion against Corruption. With that in mind, INL is rigorously

evaluating its own programming to put limited resources into

strategies that deliver accountability.

The QDDR stresses the importance of equipping our officers

with the right tools to implement our anti-corruption policies.

Since corruption touches nearly every sector, State has added

formal training opportunities for our political, economic and

public diplomacy officers at the Foreign Service Institute. We

are also sharing best practices across bureaus and incorporat-

ing corruption prevention and good governance priorities into

country and regional strategies. Even before the QDDR, our

rule-of-law assistance included a focus on building integrity

in the judiciary, transparency in government institutions and

appropriate implementation of international anti-corruption

standards.

During Fiscal Year 2015, the State Department and U.S.

Agency for International Development dedicated more than

$120 million to a wide range of programs to fight corruption

globally. This assistance helps governments develop electronic

systems—typically less prone to corruption—to carry out

government services like the provision of identification docu-

ments; supports training to build the capacity of law enforce-

ment officials, prosecutors and members of the judiciary; and

bolsters our efforts to mentor parliamentarians to implement

key legislation, among many other effective programs.

In just the past year, INL managed anti-corruption programs

across the globe, from Eastern Europe and Central America

to Afghanistan and West Africa. In Ukraine, we supported the

Interior Ministry’s efforts to recruit, vet and train 7,000 new

patrol officers; as a result, the police now enjoy an 85-percent

approval rating among Ukrainian citizens. To reinforce that

progress, last December Vice President Biden visited Kyiv to

announce an aid package totaling more than $190 million in

The 2015 QDDR gave clear

instructions to all State

employees to expand anti-

corruption initiatives and

seek ways to cooperate with

interagency colleagues to

strengthen partnerships,

promote capacity-building

abroad and increase

enforcement.