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THE FOREIGN SERVICE JOURNAL

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JULY-AUGUST 2015

17

A Comparable Commitment

of Resources

I

f military power is becoming less relevant to

the problems confronting us, what are the

alternatives? American power, the active projec-

tion of the American ethos, must be seen as a

whole. Military power is a component of national

power, standing with and reinforcing our politi-

cal, economic, moral and spiritual power. We

are not, however, a new Sparta claiming leadership on the basis of

military power alone. We are trying, imperfectly and haltingly, to identify with

and articulate a universal human consensus, to appeal to the hope in the heart

of Everyman for dignity, self-realization and a better life for himself and his

children.

The reaction abroad to President Kennedy’s death, in addition to the trib-

ute to the man, was perhaps a measure of the partial success of the efforts.

We have spent, and properly so, billions of dollars for the development of

great weapons systems. The broader and more complex challenges of the

current world now require a comparable commitment of resources for the

development of new and more sophisticated instruments for the non-mili-

tary application of American power.

—From “Applicability: The Dilemma of Military Power” by

Francis T. Underhill Jr.,

FSJ

, July 1965.

50 Years Ago

for June 5, will now take place on June 29.

Critics of Nkurunziza’s decision to seek

a third term say it is unconstitutional,

because the constitution specifies a two-

term limit. But the president argues that

because his first termwas the result of a

secure transition after the civil war, and

not a direct election, pursuit of a third

term is in fact constitutional.

While the Constitutional Court has

ruled in the president’s favor, the majority

of Burundians do not agree. Although

they considered Nkurunziza a hero for

helping Burundi heal in the wake of

its civil war, many are unhappy with

widespread government corruption and

increasing authoritarianism.

Burundi had been remarkably suc-

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cessful in smoothing ethnic tensions after

its long civil war. There are strict quotas in

police departments, the army and parlia-

ment to ensure that the Tutsi minority has

a share of power.

However, in an attempt to shift the

focus, the president’s office has already

accused Tutsis of being behind the

protest. The government has shut down

many media outlets that could provide

alternative views, and hundreds of

members of the opposition have been

arrested.

Half-hearted attempts at organizing

peace talks seem doomed after the May

23 assassination of opposition leader Zedi

Feruzi.

n

—Shannon Mizzi, Editorial Intern