The Foreign Service Journal - September 2014 - page 22

22
SEPTEMBER 2014
|
THE FOREIGN SERVICE JOURNAL
A distinguished diplomat explores
an evolving concept of diplomacy
to meet the kaleidoscope of
opportunities and challenges
America faces.
BY MARC GROSSMAN
COVER STORY
A DIPLOMACY FOR
THE 21ST CENTURY:
BACK TO THE
FUTURE?
Marc Grossman, a vice chairman of The Cohen Group inWashington,
D.C., retired from the Foreign Service in 2005 as the under secretary of
State for political affairs. During his 29-year career, Ambassador Gross-
man also served as chief of mission in Turkey (1994-1997), assistant
secretary of State for European affairs (1997-2000) and director general
of the Foreign Service (2000 -2001). He was recalled to the State Depart-
ment to serve as the U.S. special representative for Afghanistan and
Pakistan from 2011 to 2012.
The author wishes to thank Mildred Patterson, Jenny McFarland and
Dylan Vorbach for their help in preparing this article. Some of the ideas
on a diplomat’s philosophy were explored in
Joint Forces Quarterly
(No.
62, 2011). The story of the diplomatic campaign in Afghanistan and
Pakistan was reported in the
Yale Journal of International Affairs
(Sum-
mer 2013). The ideas on Ukraine were discussed in the GermanMarshall
Fund blog inMarch 2014.
S
ince my retirement from the Foreign
Service in 2005, I have had the chance,
inspired by colleagues doing the same,
to think about the future of the dip-
lomatic profession. When I meet new
Foreign Service officers, I tell them
that I envy them for having a chance to
reshape the job of diplomacy—not just
because our world has changed, but
because they are more educated, technologically savvy and
diverse than my cohort.
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