The Foreign Service Journal - October 2014 - page 55

THE FOREIGN SERVICE JOURNAL
|
OCTOBER 2014
55
AFSA NEWS
ance and the
programmatic
sides of assis-
tance programs
“one of the
most powerful
and disruptive
tensions in the
development
field today.”
He noted that
some of the most
transformative programs can
be the hardest to measure,
but warned that focus is
being taken away from these
programs in favor of more
easily quantifiable e‹orts.
Amb. Miller closed with
encouraging words for those
contemplating a career in
government or international
a‹airs.
“[These problems] can be
reversed,” he said. “To do so
will take the e‹orts of your
generation, preserving the
focus of doing good that was
the reason why so many of us
came into this profession.” A
question-and-answer session
followed the address.
The Adair Memorial
Lecture program is part of
AFSA’s national outreach to
elevate the profile of diplo-
macy and development. The
series is endowed by the fam-
ily of former AFSA President
Marshall Adair through a
perpetual gift to AFSA’s Fund
for American Diplomacy, in
memory of Charles Adair,
a retired ambassador who
spent 35 years in the Foreign
Service, and Caroline Adair.
AFSA partners with Amer-
ican University’s School of
International Studies and the
School of Professional and
Extended Studies to host the
lecture at the start of each
school year.
To see the full recording of
the Adair Lecture visit www.
afsa.org/video.
n
Debra Blome,
Associate Editor
ADA I R MEMOR I AL LECTURE :
Exploring the Relationship Between
Diplomacy and Development
On Aug. 27, AFSA presented
the Eighth Annual Caroline
and Ambassador Charles
Adair Memorial Lecture at
American University’s School
of International Service.
Ambassador Thomas
Miller spoke on “The Nexus
Between Diplomacy and
Development” to a packed
hall at the Kay Spiritual Life
Center on A.U.’s D.C. campus.
During his 29-year Foreign
Service career, Miller served
as ambassador to Greece
and Bosnia and Herzegovina,
as well as special coordina-
tor for Cyprus with the rank
of ambassador. He is now
the president and CEO of the
International Executive Ser-
vice Corps, a nonprofit that
furnishes business expertise
to the developing world.
Drawing on his experi-
ence as both a diplomat and
development professional,
Amb. Miller explored the
relationship between the two
fields. He called for increased
coordination, but cautioned
the audience to understand
the di‹erence between diplo-
macy and development.
“It is far too easy to
launch into a criticism of
either area without genuinely
appreciating that we start
from fundamentally di‹erent
perspectives,” he said.
He also criticized the
tendency of administrations
(from both parties) to “rein-
vent the wheel.”
Amb. Miller also dis-
cussed the emergence of the
“counter-bureaucracy,” which
is responsible for oversight
and compliance, calling the
clash between the compli-
Amb. Thomas Miller delivering the Eighth Annual
Adair Lecture at American University.
CHARLES ADA I R : A FORE I GN SERV I CE L I FE
Ambassador Charles Adair, for whom the lecture series is
named, joined the Foreign Service in 1940. He served as
ambassador to Panama from 1965 to 1969 and as ambassador
to Uruguay from 1969 to 1972. He also served in Mexico, India,
Brazil, Belgium, France and Argentina.
His son, retired Foreign Service o•cer and former AFSA
President Marshall Adair, notes that Amb. Adair did not have
the typical background of a diplomat from that time. He was
from a small town in Ohio—a place, Marshall Adair says, where
most didn’t even know what the Foreign Service was, but “he
made it his life.”
The Foreign Service Act of 1946 was passed during Amb.
Adair’s career, and he was a strong advocate for the profession-
alization of the Foreign Service. “Having a lecture series that
helps to tell about the Foreign Service and diplomacy is very appropriate,” says his son.
Amb. Adair died in 2006. His wife of 49 years, Caroline Marshall Adair, died in 1996.
AFSA/DEBRABLOME
Caroline and Ambassador
Charles Adair take part in a
festival in Panama in the mid
1960s.
COURTESYOFMARSHALLADAIR
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