The Foreign Service Journal - November 2014 - page 63

THE FOREIGN SERVICE JOURNAL
|
NOVEMBER 2014
63
Remembering a
Born Diplomat and
Consummate Professional
BY JAMES T. L . DANDR I DGE I I
APPRECIATION
as a result of his diplomatic excellence. He was a born diplomat,
a consummate professional who was dedicated to supporting
the execution of American foreign policy. Unarguably one of
America’s most effective Foreign Service officers, he was chief
of mission at six embassies on three continents, and earned the
highest rank in the Foreign Service, career ambassador.
The
American Heritage Dictionary
characterizes diplomacy
as tact and sensitivity in dealing with people. A major element
in Amb. Todman’s success was his respect for individuals and
cultures; he could deal with anyone, keeping his mind open and
his judgments to himself. Also, he understood that governments
were made up of people—individuals, with all their prejudices,
C
areer Ambassador Terence Alphonso
Todman died on Aug. 13, and his life was
celebrated in a memorial service on Aug.
28 in the George C. Marshall Center at the
United States Department of State.
Ambassador Todman’s service to his
country spanned almost 50 years, and he
continued to support the execution of U.S. foreign policy after his
retirement. He was the 1997 recipient of the Director General’s
Cup for the Foreign Service in recognition of his unceasing pro-
motion of the U.S. Foreign Service as a diplomat in retirement.
Many knew Amb. Todman, but even more had heard of him
Assistant Secretary of State for Inter-American Affairs Terence Todman, far right, at a Cabinet meeting with President Jimmy Carter,
third from right, and Secretary of State Cyrus Vance, sixth from right, at the White House during the Panama Canal negotiations in 1977.
Courtesy of James Dandridge II
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