The Foreign Service Journal - November 2014 - page 88

88
NOVEMBER 2014
|
THE FOREIGN SERVICE JOURNAL
since 2010, after moving fromColorado
and Chevy Chase, Md.
Mrs. Sherman is survived by her hus-
band, George, of Chelsea; four children:
Deborah (Sarah Drury) Sherman of Brook-
lyn, N.Y.; Beth (KarenHawver) Sherman
of Ann Arbor, Mich.; Justin (Junko Onishi)
Sherman of Washington, D.C.; and Andrew
(Danielle Epstein) Sherman of San Fran-
cisco, Calif.; three grandchildren: Emma,
Benjamin and Solomon; one sister, Marie
Roberts of Lexington, Mass.; and two broth-
ers: Paul Woodberry of Sea Island, Ga., and
Robert Woodberry of Walnut Creek, Calif.
Memorial contributions may bemade
to the Arbor Hospice Foundation, 40500
Ann Arbor Road E., Suite 102, Plymouth
MI 48170, or to the Silver Maples Memo-
rial Garden Fund, 100 Silver Maples Drive,
ChelseaMI 48118.
between Havana andWashington.
In Spain, he was a key negotiator for
that country’s accession to NATO. In
Argentina, he was instrumental in shoring
up American business and trade.
In 1990, Amb. Todman was awarded
the title “career ambassador,” the State
Department’s highest rank. Amb. Todman
was a harbinger of progressive change and
helped pave the way for minorities in the
department. For years he was the highest-
ranking African-American in the Foreign
Service.
In a memorial statement, Secretary
of State John Kerry said Amb. Todman
“was known for his outspokenness and
his advocacy for equality during a time of
segregation, when fewminorities could
be found at any level in the State Depart-
ment.”
On Aug. 28, AFSA and seven other orga-
nizations co-hosted a memorial service in
honor of Amb. Todman’s life and distin-
guished Foreign Service career.
He is survived by his wife of 62 years,
Doris, of St. Thomas; four children: Ter-
ence Todman Jr., Patricia Rhymer Todman,
Kathryn Browne andMichael Todman; a
brother; and six grandchildren.
n
Maurice Elmore Trout
, 96, a retired
Foreign Service officer, died peacefully
on Sept. 15 at Virginia Hospital Center in
Arlington, Va.
Mr. Trout was born on Sept. 17, 1917,
in Clifton Hill, Mo., and attended public
schools in Chicago, Ill., and Hillsdale,
Mich. He graduated fromHillsdale High
School in 1935 and in 1939 earned a B.A.
in history fromHillsdale College, where
his father, Dr. DavidM. Trout, was dean of
men and the first professor of psychology
from 1925 to 1937.
After college, Mr. Trout joined the
United States Coast Guard, serving
throughout WorldWar II until December
n
Terence Alphonso Todman
, 88, a
retired FSO and the first African-American
career ambassador, died on Aug. 13 in St.
Thomas, Virgin Islands, after a brief illness.
(See Appreciation, p. 64)
Mr. Todman was born on March 13,
1926, in St. Thomas. He attended the
Inter-American University of Puerto
Rico for a year until he was drafted into
the Army. He served in Japan, where he
helped to organize that country’s first
postwar election.
After military service, he returned to
Inter-American University, receiving a
bachelor’s degree, summa cum laude, in
political science. Later, he received a mas-
ter’s degree in public administration from
Syracuse University. He also held honorary
doctorate degrees fromColgate, Syracuse,
Morgan State and Boston universities.
Mr. Todman joined the Foreign Service
in 1954, beginning a distinguished career
that spanned nearly 50 years. His early
posts included the United Nations, Leba-
non and Tunisia.
From 1965 to 1969 he was deputy chief
of mission in Togo, before becoming coun-
try director for East African affairs in the
State Department.
He went on to be appointed ambas-
sador to six countries: Chad (1969-1972),
Guinea (1972-1975), Costa Rica (1975-
1977), Spain (1978-1983), Denmark (1983-
1989) and Argentina (1989-1993).
From 1977 to 1978, he served as assis-
tant secretary of State for Inter-American
affairs, nowWestern Hemisphere affairs.
His many ambassadorships were
influential and his accomplishments
notable. While in Costa Rica, as the first
African-American chief of mission in a
Latin American country, Ambassador Tod-
man helped negotiate the treaty that led
to Panama’s assuming ownership of the
Panama Canal, as well as agreements with
Cuba to set up regular diplomatic channels
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