The Foreign Service Journal - December 2013 - page 74

74
DECEMBER 2013
|
THE FOREIGN SERVICE JOURNAL
EDUCATION SUPPLEMENT
■ Why is my child misbehaving in
class?
■ Why is my child so nervous?
■ Why does my child seem so disorga-
nized and lazy?
■ Why is my college student struggling
with the demands that are placed on him
or her?
While every evaluator is different,
psychoeducational evaluations typically
involve five areas of questioning and
evaluation.
1.
Background information and
developmental history.
To gain a com-
prehensive picture of your child, it will be
important for the evaluator to have a full
understanding of your child’s develop-
ment leading up to the evaluation.
Often evaluators will inquire about
your child’s birth history, developmental
history, medical history, academic his-
tory, social/emotional history and family
history. Areas of concern—and when
they first became areas of concern—will
also be assessed, as well as your impres-
sions of your child’s strengths and weak-
nesses.
Some parents believe that only a
“clean slate” approach to testing will lead
to an unbiased assessment of their child.
Evaluators, however, don’t let this infor-
mation guide their evaluation; rather,
they utilize it to help in a diagnostic for-
mulation and in planning an appropriate
intervention for your child.
2.
Assessment of abilities (cognitive
functioning).
When assessing a child’s
abilities, the examiner administers a
series of measures to determine how
your child learns, as well as their ability
to process information and formulate
responses. These measures often include
verbal and visual tests to examine verbal
reasoning, nonverbal reasoning and
certain types of memory, as well as the
speed at which your child processes
1...,64,65,66,67,68,69,70,71,72,73 75,76,77,78,79,80,81,82,83,84,...104
Powered by FlippingBook