The Foreign Service Journal - December 2013 - page 92

92
DECEMBER 2013
|
THE FOREIGN SERVICE JOURNAL
EDUCATION SUPPLEMENT
“labels” that an evaluation may evoke,
the information and diagnoses provided
in reports are often useful for guiding
services and accommodations in the
school and with other professionals, such
as tutors.
In many cases, the information and
diagnoses are necessary to qualify for
special education services, as well as
accommodations on standardized test-
ing. This is especially true when applying
for accommodations in college and for
college entrance examinations.
Sharing the information with others
working with your child may also help to
clear up misconceptions. For example,
certain educators may be viewing your
child as “lazy,” when in fact a language,
learning or attention disorder is the
problem.
If a psychoeducational evaluation
is of interest to you, act now, as many
evaluators are booked far in advance. Ask
friends, teachers and pediatricians about
their experiences with certain profession-
als. Call them to see if you are comfort-
able with that person, and whether or not
your child would be comfortable with
them.
While it can seem somewhat daunting
to a parent who has never had experience
with such an evaluation, the psychoedu-
cational evaluation process can be very
enlightening for all those working with
your child. Whatever its findings, the
exercise can help ease the frustration that
both you and your child may be experi-
encing.
n
In many cases, the information and
diagnoses are necessary to qualify
for special education services,
as well as accommodations on
standardized testing.
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